Cassini Maps Sale – 25% OFF!

Cassini Quad Map

Last few days of this Special Offer! – 25% Off all maps (ends 30th Sept 2015)
Use the code C-SUN15 to claim your Discount.

Simply enter the code when prompted during checkout. P&P applies as normal.
Offer applies to all maps available on www.cassinimaps.co.uk
Including our Quad maps (4 maps of the same location but from diferent time periods) as shown above.

New! – Cassini brings you Ordnance Survey’s most detailed historical mapping.
Cassini’s Town Plan mapping is the most detailed historical Ordnance Survey mapping available. Easy to find and download.
Town Plan Map

Maps published from the mid 1800’s to the 1920’s
• Instant downloads only £9.99 (RRP:£14.99)
• Ideal for Family History research
• Choose maps from 468 available Towns
• Amazing detail – 1:500, 1:528 and 1:1056 scales (dependent on location)

These maps were published for larger towns and cities at scales of 1:500, (c.10′ to 1 mile), 1:528 (exactly 10′ to 1 mile) and 1:1056 (5′ to 1 mile) from the mid 1800’s onwards. An immense amount of detail is shown, down to every lamp-post and every pillar-box, even paths, trees and sheds in peoples gardens. For those who are particularly interested in local history and genealogy, the town plans are essential research tool.

Find maps of your area on the Cassini Maps website Town Plan Maps

Map of the week – The hottest town and the biggest bang!

Map: Ordnance Survey Old Series 1:50,000 – 1805
Faversham, Kent

Faversham in Kent. The hottest town on record and the biggest bang in history.

As summer looks to have finally arrived we decided to look at Faversham, which holds the record for the highest temperature ever recorded in the UK. A temperature of 38.5C (101.3F) was recorded at the Brogdale Horticultural Trust, on the southern edge of the town, on the 10th August 2003.

Faversham (shown on this map of 1805 as Feversham) is a market town and civil parish in the Swale district of Kent. Faversham is one of the few UK places with a hybrid Latin/Anglo-Saxon name: Favers (Latin faber = blacksmith) + ham (Anglo-Saxon ham = homestead).

The building of Watling Street, soon after the Romans arrived in 43AD, led to the growth of small settlements along-side the road with the first in this area being built at Ospringe. Not long after, the small town of Durolevum (meaning stronghold by the clear stream) was established nearby and grew to become modern day Faversham. In 811AD the name of ‘Fefresham’ was first recorded in a Royal Charter calling it “the king’s town”. Faversham is the only town in the UK to use the Royal arms of England as its own heraldic emblem.
The town also became known as the birthplace of the explosives industry in England. 

The first gunpowder plants were established in the 16th century, The early factories were small, but by the early 18th century these had formed into a single plant, later to be known as the Home Works. A second factory was started by Huguenot settlers towards the end of the 17th century, and became known as the Oare Works. The third and last gunpowder factory to open was the Marsh Works, built by the British government 1 km northwest of the town and opened in 1787.

When the First World War started in 1914, the two original factories were requisitioned by the Admiralty. Production facilities were expanded and many new staff recruited from Faversham and elsewhere in east Kent.

At 2.20pm on Sunday 2 April 1916, a huge explosion ripped through the Marsh Works gunpowder mill, when 200 tons of TNT ignited. The blast killed 105 people and was recorded as “the worst ever in the history of the UK explosives industry”. The munitions factory was in a remote spot in the middle of the open marshes, next to the Thames coastline and was heard across the Thames estuary as far away as Norwich, Great Yarmouth and Southend-on-Sea, where domestic windows were blown out and two large plate-glass shop windows shattered.

All three gunpowder factories closed in 1934. ICI, the then owners, sensed that war might break out with Germany, and realised that Faversham would then become vulnerable to air attacks or possibly invasion. Production was transferred to Ayrshire, Scotland.

If you have an interesting story and would like to see a historical map of your area then why not let us know by emailing us.

Find out more about your area of the UK

Maps, Genealogy and Local History

Many people today are interested in genealogy to understand not just where and when people lived, but also their lifestyles, surroundings and motivations. This often requires knowledge of old political boundaries, migration trends and historical social conditions. One important way to understand how one’s ancestors fit into the landscapes of the past is to place them in space and time by using historical mapping.

family

“My Mother’s grandmother came from Woolbeding, a tiny settlement near Midhurst. I found your map very useful when I went to visit the area because I could trace the original roads unobscured by modern developments. It was great to see the house where my great-grandmother’s twin sister was a dairy maid in 1871 and the tiny church next door still candlelit where they were baptised.” Miss Driscoll, Manchester
Genealogical research is a complex process that uses historical records to answer questions about ones ancestors, the time they lived in, the work they undertook and their surroundings. Reliable conclusions are based on quality sources and historical maps have an important part to play in discovering where and how your ancestors lived.

From the beginnings of Britain’s industrial past to the more sedate life of a victorian country village more detailed can help to put the lives of your ancestors into context. The interest In old maps is constantly growing as more maps become available and the ability to see more and more detail allows the researcher to view ever increasing details of the past.

For example – In the last 200 years Coventry has grown in population from 21,853 in 1801 to 310,500 in 2010. Many of the old outlying towns and villages have been absorbed into the conurbation we see today and the only way of understanding the landscape they used to live in is to view the maps of the time.

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Old Series 1831          Present Day

“Old maps of the sort published by Cassini are an excellent introduction to local history throughout the United Kingdom because they focus the user’s attention on the sort of unexpected questions that act as starting points for research.  “Well, I never knew that there was a house in that location 200 years ago”.  “I never realised that xxxx Road followed a different course 150 years ago . . . why?”.  Of course, detailed local histories will probably contain the answers to some of these questions – but they hardly ever force them on you as vividly– and attractively – as old maps. And, in some cases, you will find yourself asking questions that even the standard histories do not answer.  So, before consulting those published histories, look at the maps!”    Peter Barber  MA, FSA, FRHistS Head of Map Collections, British Library

From the beginnings of Britain’s industrial past to the more sedate life of a victorian country village more detailed maps are now available to put the lives of your ancestors into context. The interest In old maps is constantly growing as more maps become available and the ability to see more and more detail allows the researcher to view ever increasing details of the past.

 

Map of the week – Bournemouth 1811

Map of the week – Bournemouth 1811
Bournemouth

Ordnance Survey Old Series 1:50,000  (and present day OS 1:50,000)

At the start of the 19th century the area was largely a remote and barren heathland, used only by smugglers and revenue troops.

A man called Tregonwell is regarded as the first inhabitant of Bournemouth. In 1810 he visited the beach with his wife. She loved the area and persuaded him to build the first house. By 1840 a small village had sprung up. By 1851 Bournemouth was still a little village with a population of only 695, but it was growing rapidly and by 1861 the population had grown to 1,707.

The railway reached Bournemouth in 1870, which caused the town to boom. By 1881 the population of Bournemouth stood at 16,859. Ten years later it reached 37,000.

In two hundred years Bournemouth has grown from Tregonwell’s single house to a population of 183,491 making it the largest settlement in Dorset. With Poole to the west and Christchurch in the east, Bournemouth forms the South East Dorset conurbation, which has a total population of over 400,000.

Find maps of your area.

Cassini map of the week – Guildford 1816

Cassini’s map of the week – Guildford

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Guildford 1816 Ordnance Survey Old Series

Ever wondered why Guildford developed in the location seen today? By referring to the Cassini Old Series maps it can be seen how Guildford, the county town of Surrey, developed in a gap in the North Downs, through which the River Wey passes. Any traveller in Surrey heading from North to South, or vice versa, would make straight for the gap in the chalk hills rather than climbing the the escarpments of the downs.

Before the advent of contour lines each hand drawn Ordnance Survey map indicated the relief of the land with hatchuring (from the Old French word hacher, to cross hatch) making it clearly visible how the landscape played a vital role in the positioning and settlement of cities, towns and villages across the length and breadth Britain.

Look out for special offers  at www.cassinimaps.co.uk

Ordnance Survey Six-Inch County Series

Surveyed 1852, published 1855
(available from http://www.cassinimaps.co.uk/shop/downloads.asp)

The origins of the six-inch to the mile (1:10,560) maps date back to 1824 when this scale was adopted for a survey of Ireland. By 1840 it had been decided to extend the project to Great Britain. Work began in Lancashire and Yorkshire in 1841 and in Scotland in 1843 with the first sheet appearing in 1846. It was not until 1890 that maps covering the whole country had been published, the first generation of what later became known as the County Series.

OS10k

By that time revisions to the earlier sheets were already underway, a rolling process that continued until the last County Series sheets were superseded by the 1:10,000 National Grid Edition in the 1980s. Each sheet appeared in up to six editions, displaying various evolutions of detail, format and reproduction technology. For over a century, the Ordnance Survey’s
County Series maps reveal the changing face of Britain in compelling and painstaking detail and now provide immaculate records for 21st-century researchers and historians.

Cassini has reproduced County Series maps of most areas of England and Wales. This involves combining more than one original sheet to give an appropriate area of coverage. In the process, the maps have been enlarged slightly to 1:10,000 so bringing them into line with more recent maps at this metric scale.

Ordnance Survey Old Series Maps

Surveyed 1791-1874, published 1805-1874
(available from http://www.cassinimaps.co.uk/shop/printed.asp)

The Cassini Old Series provides a fascinating snapshot of the human geography of Britain in the mid-19th century. These maps are taken from the Ordnance Survey One-Inch ‘Old Series’ sheets, surveyed between 1791 and 1874 and published – with many revisions and new editions – between 1805 and 1874. The Ordnance Survey’s 19th-century cartographers managed to create, without most of the technology that today’s map-makers take for granted, a stunningly elegant and accurate survey of Britain at this crucial time in its history.

OSE

The history of the Ordnance Survey’s mapping begins in 1791 when the government, fearful of the threat of an invasion by French revolutionary forces, instructed the then Board of Ordnance to make a detailed survey of the vulnerable southern regions of England. The upheavals in France and the subsequent Napoleonic Wars passed without an invasion, but the work of the Ordnance Survey continued and soon turned into a major national project. The driving force behind this was the indefatigable Thomas Colby, who later became Superintendent of the Ordnance Survey in 1820. Colby designed many of the instruments used in the surveys and did much to standardise the processes of collecting the data and creating the final maps.

He involved himself in all aspects of the work and personally covered countless miles with his teams of surveyors. The task was enormous and quite unlike anything attempted before; perhaps only the equally remarkable achievement of the Domesday Book over 700 years earlier comes close to the scale and scope of this enterprise, which was to take the best part of 100 years to complete.

At the beginning of the nineteenth century some maps at the one-inch (1:63,360) scale based on Board of Ordnance surveys were already available to the public, including Jersey (1787), Sussex (1795) and Kent (1801 – the ‘Mudge map’). William Faden, Geographer to the King, published the Sussex and Kent maps: the first published by the Ordnance Survey was the map of Essex in four sheets which appeared in 1805. This was the start of a nationally (England & Wales) numbered 110-sheet map series (with many being originally published as quarter-sheets), which later became known as the ‘Old Series’. The next maps to be produced, in 1809, covered Devon and parts of Cornwall and Somerset. These are sheets 20 to 27, although this numbering system was only adopted later and so the numbers do not reflect the order of publication. The Ordnance Survey’s maps were regarded as being so vital to national security that during the Napoleonic Wars an embargo was placed on their sale to the public.
OSEFacsThe mapping used the Cassini projection, which was to be the projection most commonly employed by the Ordnance Survey until the 1940s. It soon became clear that the policy of using a meridian of 3ºW for the western maps and Greenwich’s 0º for the eastern ones would lead to a convergence between the western and eastern sheets which became more pronounced as the maps progressed north. It was eventually decided to use a single new meridian with its origin in Delamere Forest, Cheshire. The convergence, and the new base line (the Preston to Hull line) of the sheets from 91 to 94 northwards, which was perpendicular to the meridian through Delamere.

With very few exceptions (the Isle of Wight and the area around the Preston to Hull line) the Old Series maps were produced without any overlaps. This posed various challenges in the creation of these Cassini Historical Maps, as it was necessary to find originals with four perfect edges in order to create a neat join. Where this was not possible, several copies of the same map had to be sourced and a digital composite created. The use of quarter-sheets, which became increasingly used as the One-Inch project progressed, compounded this problem, as did the fact that many major cities were split across more than one map.

The period these maps cover was one of enormous change. The demographic shifts caused by increased wealth and the industrial revolution had already made existing maps largely useless, but much of the underlying fabric of the past was still intact. The population of Great Britain in 1850 was three times greater than it had been in 1700, but only a third of what it is now. An increasing number of people were living in the cities; around 1850, for the only time in British history, the rural and urban populations were equal. The major conurbations of today were already well established but were still separated by open countryside and numerous villages and hamlets, many of which have long been lost under roads and houses and whose names, where they survive at all, are now only dimly remembered. Ancient roads were being augmented by the recent revolutions of the canals and railways, and these advances in transport and communication did much to encourage both the demand for the maps and the ability to create them. The Old Series maps are thus a record of England and Wales on the eve of a momentous transition from its centuries-old agrarian past towards its dramatic 20th century urbanisation.