Coastal erosion and the vanishing towns

Ordnance Survey Old Series – 1837 and Ordnance Survey – 2013

Coastal Erosion on the East Coast

Covehithe

is a hamlet and civil parish in the Waveney district of the English county of Suffolk.
It lies on the North Sea coast around 4 miles north of Southwold and 7 miles south of Lowestoft.

In the Domesday survey of 1086 the village is named as Nordhalla or Nordhals and is recorded as being a medium sized settlement with 13 households of freemen or smallholders.

In the Middle Ages Covehithe prospered as a small town and during the reign of Edward I was granted the right to hold a fair on the feast day of St Andrew. By the 17th Century however it had fallen victim, like nearby Dunwich, to coastal erosion and now modern Covehithe has a population of around 20.

Cliff edgeErosion caused the coastline at Covehithe to retreat more than 500 metres between the 1830s and 2001, according to contemporary Ordnance Survey maps. This can be seen most obviously on the sand cliffs above the beach where the road running from the church simply falls away down onto the beach.

The coastal cliffs at Covehithe are formed of glacial sands and other deposits, consequently they are loose and unconsolidated and erode at up to 4.5 metres a year. The main part of the settlement at Covehithe is around 250 metres from the current shoreline, but some say it’s possible that Covehithe could be lost to erosion by as early as 2040.

The Monty Python sketch ‘The First Man To Jump The Channel’ was partly filmed at Covehithe beach, although, of course, the Channel was narrower then…

If you have an interesting story and would like to see a historical map of your area then why not let us know by emailing us.

Find out more about your area of the UK

Map of the week – St. George’s Chapel, Windsor

Map: Ordnance Survey County Series 1:1,056 – 1871
St George's Chapel, Windsor

 St. George’s Chapel, Windsor – burial place of Henry VIII

Henry Tudor was born in the royal residence of Greenwich Palace on June 28, 1491, son of Henry VII of England and Elizabeth York. Not much is known about his early life because he was not born first in line to the throne, a role destined for his older brother Arthur, but  in 1502, at the age of only 15, Arthur died in Ludlow Castle where he resided in his capacity as Prince of Wales. Arthur’s death thrust all of his royal duties upon his younger brother, the 10-year-old Henry.

Henry was crowned Henry VIII, king of England following the death of his father on 22 April 1509.

Besides his six marriages, Henry VIII is known for his role in the separation of the Church of England from the Roman Catholic Church. His struggles with Rome led to the separation of the Church of England from papal authority, the Dissolution of the Monasteries, and his own establishment as the Supreme Head of the Church of England.

His contemporaries considered Henry in his prime to be an attractive, educated and accomplished king, and he has been described as “one of the most charismatic rulers to sit on the English throne”.
Later in life, Henry became obese, with a waist measurement of 54 inches and his physical decline can be traced to a jousting accident in 1536, in which he suffered a leg wound that never healed as well as head injuries.

Henry died in London on the 28th January 1547  and was buried in St George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle, next to his third wife Jane Seymour, who had given birth to Henry’s only legitimate son, Edward, the future Edward VI. Over a hundred years later, Charles I was buried in the same vault. All three still lie in the vault beneath the quire in St. Georges Chapel, Windsor.

If you have an interesting story and would like to see a historical map of your area then why not let us know by emailing us.

Find out more about your area of the UK

Cassini Maps – 30% Off special offer

Cassini Maps is offering 30% Off all maps on their www.cassinimaps.co.uk website
Special Offer April 2013Personalised historical Maps are available from 1805 to the 1940’s.

Whether you are tracing the history of your family or just interested in the local history of the area where you live, reliable conclusions are based on quality sources and Cassini historical maps have an important part to play in discovering where and how your ancestors lived.

Cassini Maps also make diverting, decorative and practical presents for anyone with any interest in the past. For weddings, anniversaries, birthdays or Christmas; for your friends, your relatives – or even for yourself. Ideal as business gifts centred on your company location.

To get 30% of all maps from Cassini simply enter the code: C-APRIL-30 when prompted during the checkout process.
P&P applies as normal. Offer available until the 3rd May 2013.

Find historical maps of your home from Cassini Maps!

Who Do You Think you Are – Live 2013

Come and meet Cassini on stand:522 of this years Who Do You Think You Are – Live.
WDYTYA-Live

 

 

 

“Finding your ancestors just got easier at the world’s leading family history event! Whether you’re new to tracing your family tree or a seasoned researcher, it’s packed with genealogy experts, informative workshops, over 160 specialist exhibitors and celebrities from the television series to help you with your own family history search.”

Cassini will be attending the event so drop in and say hello – and while you’re there have a look at the maps on offer. It’s a great way to see before you buy.
For more information about Who Do You Think You Are – Live visit the website

 

Map of the week – The Foundling Hospital

Map: Stanford’s Library Atlas published in 1891
The Foundling Hospital

The Foundling Hospital
The Foundling Hospital (The word “hospital” was used in a more general sense than it is today) was founded in 1741 by philanthropic sea captain Thomas Coram. It was a children’s home established for the “education and maintenance of exposed and deserted young children.”In September 1742, the first stone of the a Hospital was laid in Bloomsbury, lying north of Great Ormond Street and west of Gray’s Inn Lane (the first children were admitted to the Foundling Hospital on 25 March 1741, in a temporary house in Hatton Garden). The western wing was finished in October 1745. An eastern wing was added in 1752 “in order that the girls might be kept separate from the boys”.The Hospital was later to be described as “the most imposing single monument erected by eighteenth century benevolence” and became London’s most popular charity.In 1756, the House of Commons resolved that all children offered should be received, that local receiving places should be appointed all over the country, and that the funds should be publicly guaranteed. A basket was accordingly hung outside the hospital; the maximum age for admission was raised from two months to twelve, and a flood of children poured in from country workhouses. In less than four years 14,934 children were presented at the door..In the 1920s, the Hospital decided to move to a healthier location in the countryside. The buildings were eventually sold to property developer James White in 1926. He had hoped to transfer Covent Garden Market to the site, but the local residents successfully opposed the plan. In the end, the original Hospital building was demolished and the children were moved to Redhill in Surrey.

The Foundling Hospital still has a legacy on the original site. Seven acres of it were purchased, with financial support from the newspaper proprietor Lord Rothermere, for use as a playground for children. The area is now called Coram’s Fields.

If you have an interesting story and would like to see a historical map of your area then why not let us know by using the contact form.

Map of the week – Grey Friars, burial place of King Richard III

DeadKingMap2

Map Date: 1887

Greyfriars was a Franciscan monastic community (called Grey Friars from the colour of their garments), established on the west side of Leicester from about 1255, and demolished at its dissolution in the late 1530s. Although a small monastery, its Church acquired national significance when Richard III was buried there following his death at Bosworth Field.

Richard III (2 October 1452 – 22 August 1485) was King of England for two years, from 1483 until his death in 1485 in the Battle of Bosworth Field. He was the last king of the House of York and the last of the Plantagenet dynasty. His defeat at Bosworth Field, the decisive battle of the Wars of the Roses, is sometimes regarded as the end of the Middle Ages in England.

In August 1485, a rebellion led by Henry Tudor landed in Pembrokeshire, with a small contingent of French troops, and marched through Wales recruiting foot soldiers and skilled archers on his way towards London.

Richard mustered his troops and intercepted Henry’s army south of Market Bosworth. The King divided his army, which outnumbered Henry’s, into three groups. One was assigned to the Duke of Norfolk and another to the Earl of Northumberland. Henry kept most of his force together under the command of the experienced Earl of Oxford. Richard’s vanguard, commanded by Norfolk, attacked but struggled against Oxford’s men. Northumberland took no action when signalled to assist his king, so Richard gambled everything on a charge across the battlefield to kill Henry and end the fight. Seeing the king’s knights separated from his army, Lord Stanley, and Sir William Stanley, who had brought a force to the battlefield, but held back while they decided which side it would be more advantageous to support, led their men to Henry’s aid, surrounding and killing Richard. Richard was the last English king to die in battle.

Following his death at Bosworth Field, Richard III’s body was thrown across a horse and carried to Leicester where, after a period of public display, it was buried inside Greyfriars Church. Ten years later, Henry VII paid for a tomb to be built. The tomb was presumed to have been demolished along with the Church following its dissolution after 1536.

Sir Robert Catlyn acquired the site following its dissolution by Henry VIII and sold it to Robert Herrick, who built a mansion with extensive gardens over the east end of the Friary grounds. These gardens were visited by Christopher Wren Sr. in 1611, who recorded being shown a handsome stone pillar with an inscription, “Here lies the body of Richard III, some time King of England”. Any remains of such a pillar having long since disappeared with the subsequent redevelopment of the land.

However, the Archaeology service of the University of Leicester, along with the Richard III Society and Leicester City Council, initiated an archaeological study resulting in three trenches being dug across the parking area behind the buildings on Greyfriars. These excavations revealed walls of the cloisters and the Church, enabling a possible layout for the monastic buildings to be drawn. Also found was the complete skeleton of a male showing severe scoliosis and major head wounds. On 4 February 2013 it was confirmed that the DNA matched, that the radiocarbon agreed, and that the characteristics of the bones and the nature of the head wounds were all entirely consistent with it being the remains of Richard III.

Find out about the changes to your local area with Cassini Maps
Look out for cassini special offers – 20% Off Historical Map Canvases

Map of the week – Alloway & Burns Night

BurnsNight

Robert Burns (25 January 1759 – 21 July 1796)

Robert Burns CottageOn this day: On the 25th January 1759, Robert Burns was born in a humble cottage in the village of Alloway, two miles south of Ayr. His parents Willian Burnes (later changed to Burns) and Agnes Broun were tenant farmers, but they ensured their son received a good education and he soon began to read avidly. Burns increasingly turned his attentions away from farming and towards the passions of poetry, nature, drink and women which would characterise the rest of his life

Burns Night, in effect a second national day, is celebrated on Burns’s birthday, 25 January, with Burns suppers around the world. The first Burns supper in The Mother Club in Greenock was held on what was thought to be his birthday on 29 January 1802; in 1803 it was discovered from the Ayr parish records that the correct date was 25 January 1759.

The format of Burns suppers has changed little since. The basic format starts with a general welcome and announcements, followed with the Selkirk Grace. After the grace comes the piping and cutting of the haggis, when Burns’s famous “Address to a Haggis” is read and the haggis is cut open.

Address to a Haggis (first verse)
Fair fa’ your honest, sonsie face,
Great chieftain o’ the puddin-race!
Aboon them a’ ye tak your place,
Painch, tripe, or thairm:
Weel are ye wordy o’ a grace
As lang’s my arm.

(sonsie = jolly/cheerful, aboon = above, painch = paunch/stomach, thairm = intestine)

The event usually allows for people to start eating just after the haggis is presented. This is when the reading called the “immortal memory”, an overview of Burns’s life and work, is given. The event usually concludes with the singing of “Auld Lang Syne”.

Find out more about Scotland* or your area of the UK

Map of the week – No. 39 Hilldrop Crescent, Holloway.

On this day: On the 23rd November 1910, Dr Hawley Crippen was hanged at Pentonville Prison after being convicted a month earlier of the murder of his wife Cora.
crippenmap
(map shown: Ordnance Survey – 1873)

The couple had moved to the UK from New York in 1897 and eventually settled in London at 39, Hilldrop Crescent, Holloway in 1905.Dr Crippen’s US medical qualification did not allow him to practice as a doctor in the UK, he therefore found other work as the manger of Drouet’s Institute for the Deaf where he met his mistress, Ethel le Neve. Meanwhile, his wife Cora continued her affair with a lodger they had taken in to supplement their income.

On January 31st 1910, Cora disappeared. Crippen claimed she’d returned to the US and later claimed she had died there. The police became suspicious and searched No 39 Hilldrop Crescent but found nothing. Crippen and le Neve fled in panic and in doing so made the police more suspicious. The house was searched a further 3 times, the final search revealed the remains of a body, buried beneath the basement brick floor.
Crippen was eventually captured on the ocean liner SS Montrose whilst fleeing to Canada and was returned to London for trial. His arrest came after a message was sent from Scotland Yard to the Montrose. It was the first time that the invention of radio had been used in the hunt for a killer.

No 39 Hilldrop Crescent was destroyed by a German bomb during a raid in 1942. A block of flats now stands in its place.

Find out more about your area

Map of the week – Moneygall the birthplace of Falmouth Kearney

In 1850 Falmouth Kearney, a maternal great-great-great grandfather of Barack Obama, emigrated from the Irish village of Moneygall in County Offaly to New York City before eventually settling in Tipton County, Indiana. Kearney’s daughter Mary Ann, the youngest of his ten children, was the grandmother of Stanley Dunham, President Obama’s maternal grandfather.
obama3
(map shown: Irish 6 Inch First Edition – 1840) 

When Kearney, with his sister Margaret Cleary and her husband William, set sail for the United States they left behind a country plagued by the potato blight that had destroyed families and livelihoods and left people starving. From the 1840s to the end of the 1850s, about 1.7 million emigrants moved from Ireland to the United States. In 1841 the population of the entire parish of Moneygall was approximately 8,500. Today the population is about 1,600.

Moneygall is to be found on the border of counties Offaly and North Tipperary. The name (Muine Gall in Irish, meaning ‘thicket of (the) foreigners’ ) is thought to come from the remains of Viking raiders who were slain and buried nearby after a failed attack on the great annual market at Rosecrea in 942.

Cassini has historical Ordnance Survey maps of Ireland. Simply search for the area you are interested in and buy.
Choose from
Irish 6 Inch First Edition –  c.1840s
Ireland First Edition –  c.1860s
Ireland Third Edition –  c.1900s

Printed Maps only £15.95
Downloadable Maps £8.95