Historical Map Downloads – Half price!

Cassini Downloadable maps
Warnborough - 1871. 1:2,500

From only £3.99 – One week only. Offer finishes on the 16th February 2015
Coverage – England, Scotland, Wales.
Ideal for research, or print and frame for a personalised decorative map centred on the location of your choice. A4 maps £3.99, A3 maps £4.99

Cassini’s downloadable maps from 1805 to the present day.

• Instant map downloads of any area.  • Including personal inscription.
• Available for all historical OS series. • Choose from eight historical map series
• Highly customisable.                          • Coverage of England, Scotland* and Wales.

Cassini is delighted to offer you our stunning range of historical Ordnance Survey maps. Whatever your interest in the past our historical maps are invaluable works of reference. Ideal for reasearch, or print and frame for a personalised decorative map centred on the location of your choice.

Simply search for the area you are interested in, buy and download the PDF. No waiting for the map to arrive in the post.

Maps available for site-centred downloads
1855-1896 County Series 1:2,500
1880-1910 County Series 1:10,000
1805-1874 Old Series 1:30,000 – 1:50,000
1871 Registration District 1:30,000 – 1:50,000
1896-1904 Revised New 1:30,000 – 1:50,000
1919-1926 Popular Edition 1:30,000 – 1:50,000
1945-1948 New Popular 1:30,000 – 1:50,000
Present Day Ordnance Survey 1:30,000 – 1:50,000

*Scottish maps are only available for Old Series 1805-1874, Revised New Series 1896-1904 and Presentr Day OS mapping.

Visit Cassini Maps to find maps of your area.

25% OFF All Cassini Historical Maps!

25% Off Cassini historical maps!
To help you enjoy the summer Cassini Historical Maps is offering 25% off all maps and personalised map gifts until the end of August 2013. To get your discount simply use the code C-AUG13 when prompted during checkout.

Visit www.cassinimaps.co.uk now and see which maps we have available for your area. Buy them for yourself or make a present of the past to someone in your life.

Cassini Maps – 30% Off special offer

Cassini Maps is offering 30% Off all maps on their www.cassinimaps.co.uk website
Special Offer April 2013Personalised historical Maps are available from 1805 to the 1940’s.

Whether you are tracing the history of your family or just interested in the local history of the area where you live, reliable conclusions are based on quality sources and Cassini historical maps have an important part to play in discovering where and how your ancestors lived.

Cassini Maps also make diverting, decorative and practical presents for anyone with any interest in the past. For weddings, anniversaries, birthdays or Christmas; for your friends, your relatives – or even for yourself. Ideal as business gifts centred on your company location.

To get 30% of all maps from Cassini simply enter the code: C-APRIL-30 when prompted during the checkout process.
P&P applies as normal. Offer available until the 3rd May 2013.

Find historical maps of your home from Cassini Maps!

Map of the week – Twickenham Stadium

Twickenham Stadium
If you have an interesting story and would like to see a historical map of your area then why not let us knowThe Site Of Twickenham by leaving a reply?

Ordnance Survey County Series 1:2500 scale with present-day aerial photo overlay.

This weekend, Twickenham Stadium will host the England – France Rugby Union match – sometimes known as le Crunch. This is the 84th time the 2 sides have met in the Six Nations (previously Five Nations) Championship.

Although the teams had met from 1906, the first match between the 2 nations in this Championship was played at the Parc des Princes in Paris in 1910 (France winning 11-3).
The following year, they met at Twickenham with an English victory of 37-0.

The map here shows the land prior to being bought by the RFU in 1907 with an overlay of the Stadium today. England had previously hosted their international matches at Crystal Palace, Richmond Athletic Ground or at Welford Road in Leicester.

The RFU, advised by their committee member William Williams and their treasurer William Cail that a new RFU home was needed, decided to buy the land on the east bank of the River Crane near the village of Whitton and to the north of the town of Twickenham.

Part of the land purchased was a market garden growing cabbages – the Stadium today is still affectionately known as the Cabbage Patch.

The first game played at the ground was in 1909 between local teams, Harlequins and Richmond. The first international match was played the following year between England and Wales.

The Stadium’s original capacity was 20,000 spectators, today, after much redevelopment, it can hold 82,000 making it the second largest stadium in the UK after Wembley and the fifth largest in Europe.

Apart from a brief spell as grazing land during WW1, it has remained the world’s largest stadium dedicated solely to rugby – although it has hosted numerous rock concerts and even a BBC Top Gear Car Rugby match…

Map of the week – Edgehill

EdgehillJanuary 1643

3 months after the first battle of the Civil War, Edgehill, a pamphlet describing the ghostly events that continued in the area after the battle was published. Titled “A Great Wonder in Heaven”, it reported the first encounter with a ghostly re-enactment of the battle by local shepherds. The priest at Kineton also described his brush with the ghosts when around the battlefield. King Charles dispatched a Royal Commission to investigate – they too described a ghostly battle scene, the details tallied with survivors actual accounts of the real battle.

The villagers decided the only way to rid themselves of these phantoms was to bury all the battle-dead in Christian graves (the bodies still remained on the field through the winter).

This map shows the battle area with Grave Ground and Graveground Coppice clearly marked.

To this day, there are still reports of eerie sounds and phantom soldiers appearing at the scene on the anniversary of the battle.

The area has also has a fascinating 20th century military history that can be explored

Map of the week – Moneygall the birthplace of Falmouth Kearney

In 1850 Falmouth Kearney, a maternal great-great-great grandfather of Barack Obama, emigrated from the Irish village of Moneygall in County Offaly to New York City before eventually settling in Tipton County, Indiana. Kearney’s daughter Mary Ann, the youngest of his ten children, was the grandmother of Stanley Dunham, President Obama’s maternal grandfather.
obama3
(map shown: Irish 6 Inch First Edition – 1840) 

When Kearney, with his sister Margaret Cleary and her husband William, set sail for the United States they left behind a country plagued by the potato blight that had destroyed families and livelihoods and left people starving. From the 1840s to the end of the 1850s, about 1.7 million emigrants moved from Ireland to the United States. In 1841 the population of the entire parish of Moneygall was approximately 8,500. Today the population is about 1,600.

Moneygall is to be found on the border of counties Offaly and North Tipperary. The name (Muine Gall in Irish, meaning ‘thicket of (the) foreigners’ ) is thought to come from the remains of Viking raiders who were slain and buried nearby after a failed attack on the great annual market at Rosecrea in 942.

Cassini has historical Ordnance Survey maps of Ireland. Simply search for the area you are interested in and buy.
Choose from
Irish 6 Inch First Edition –  c.1840s
Ireland First Edition –  c.1860s
Ireland Third Edition –  c.1900s

Printed Maps only £15.95
Downloadable Maps £8.95

Map of the week – Berkeley Castle and the last days of Edward II

Berkeley Castle, whose origins date to the 11th century, can be found on the outskirts of the town of Berkeley, Gloucestershire and is traditionally believed to be the scene of the murder of King Edward II.
BerkelyCastle
The map shown above is a 1:2,500 county series map from 1880

Edward’s reign was marked by alleged incompetence, political squabbling and military losses including the devastating defeat at Bannockburn in 1314. He was eventually overthrown by his wife Isabella of France and Roger Mortimer, an exiled opponent of Edward, in favour of Isabella’s son who was crowned Edward III in January 1327.

After Edward II was deposed in 1326 he was exiled to Berkeley Castle, where in late September 1327, after a failed escape, he was reputedly murdered by means unknown. Although popular stories of a red hot poker or suffocation persist, some commentators have claimed that Edward’s escape was actually successful, and that someone else was later murdered in his place. Whatever the truth, much of the original fabric of Berkeley Castle still stands as a reminder of the last days of one of England’s Plantagenet kings.

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