Who Do You Think you Are – Live 2013

Come and meet Cassini on stand:522 of this years Who Do You Think You Are – Live.
WDYTYA-Live

 

 

 

“Finding your ancestors just got easier at the world’s leading family history event! Whether you’re new to tracing your family tree or a seasoned researcher, it’s packed with genealogy experts, informative workshops, over 160 specialist exhibitors and celebrities from the television series to help you with your own family history search.”

Cassini will be attending the event so drop in and say hello – and while you’re there have a look at the maps on offer. It’s a great way to see before you buy.
For more information about Who Do You Think You Are – Live visit the website

 

Map of the week – Twickenham Stadium

Twickenham Stadium
If you have an interesting story and would like to see a historical map of your area then why not let us knowThe Site Of Twickenham by leaving a reply?

Ordnance Survey County Series 1:2500 scale with present-day aerial photo overlay.

This weekend, Twickenham Stadium will host the England – France Rugby Union match – sometimes known as le Crunch. This is the 84th time the 2 sides have met in the Six Nations (previously Five Nations) Championship.

Although the teams had met from 1906, the first match between the 2 nations in this Championship was played at the Parc des Princes in Paris in 1910 (France winning 11-3).
The following year, they met at Twickenham with an English victory of 37-0.

The map here shows the land prior to being bought by the RFU in 1907 with an overlay of the Stadium today. England had previously hosted their international matches at Crystal Palace, Richmond Athletic Ground or at Welford Road in Leicester.

The RFU, advised by their committee member William Williams and their treasurer William Cail that a new RFU home was needed, decided to buy the land on the east bank of the River Crane near the village of Whitton and to the north of the town of Twickenham.

Part of the land purchased was a market garden growing cabbages – the Stadium today is still affectionately known as the Cabbage Patch.

The first game played at the ground was in 1909 between local teams, Harlequins and Richmond. The first international match was played the following year between England and Wales.

The Stadium’s original capacity was 20,000 spectators, today, after much redevelopment, it can hold 82,000 making it the second largest stadium in the UK after Wembley and the fifth largest in Europe.

Apart from a brief spell as grazing land during WW1, it has remained the world’s largest stadium dedicated solely to rugby – although it has hosted numerous rock concerts and even a BBC Top Gear Car Rugby match…

Map of the week – The Foundling Hospital

Map: Stanford’s Library Atlas published in 1891
The Foundling Hospital

The Foundling Hospital
The Foundling Hospital (The word “hospital” was used in a more general sense than it is today) was founded in 1741 by philanthropic sea captain Thomas Coram. It was a children’s home established for the “education and maintenance of exposed and deserted young children.”In September 1742, the first stone of the a Hospital was laid in Bloomsbury, lying north of Great Ormond Street and west of Gray’s Inn Lane (the first children were admitted to the Foundling Hospital on 25 March 1741, in a temporary house in Hatton Garden). The western wing was finished in October 1745. An eastern wing was added in 1752 “in order that the girls might be kept separate from the boys”.The Hospital was later to be described as “the most imposing single monument erected by eighteenth century benevolence” and became London’s most popular charity.In 1756, the House of Commons resolved that all children offered should be received, that local receiving places should be appointed all over the country, and that the funds should be publicly guaranteed. A basket was accordingly hung outside the hospital; the maximum age for admission was raised from two months to twelve, and a flood of children poured in from country workhouses. In less than four years 14,934 children were presented at the door..In the 1920s, the Hospital decided to move to a healthier location in the countryside. The buildings were eventually sold to property developer James White in 1926. He had hoped to transfer Covent Garden Market to the site, but the local residents successfully opposed the plan. In the end, the original Hospital building was demolished and the children were moved to Redhill in Surrey.

The Foundling Hospital still has a legacy on the original site. Seven acres of it were purchased, with financial support from the newspaper proprietor Lord Rothermere, for use as a playground for children. The area is now called Coram’s Fields.

If you have an interesting story and would like to see a historical map of your area then why not let us know by using the contact form.

Map of the week – Grey Friars, burial place of King Richard III

DeadKingMap2

Map Date: 1887

Greyfriars was a Franciscan monastic community (called Grey Friars from the colour of their garments), established on the west side of Leicester from about 1255, and demolished at its dissolution in the late 1530s. Although a small monastery, its Church acquired national significance when Richard III was buried there following his death at Bosworth Field.

Richard III (2 October 1452 – 22 August 1485) was King of England for two years, from 1483 until his death in 1485 in the Battle of Bosworth Field. He was the last king of the House of York and the last of the Plantagenet dynasty. His defeat at Bosworth Field, the decisive battle of the Wars of the Roses, is sometimes regarded as the end of the Middle Ages in England.

In August 1485, a rebellion led by Henry Tudor landed in Pembrokeshire, with a small contingent of French troops, and marched through Wales recruiting foot soldiers and skilled archers on his way towards London.

Richard mustered his troops and intercepted Henry’s army south of Market Bosworth. The King divided his army, which outnumbered Henry’s, into three groups. One was assigned to the Duke of Norfolk and another to the Earl of Northumberland. Henry kept most of his force together under the command of the experienced Earl of Oxford. Richard’s vanguard, commanded by Norfolk, attacked but struggled against Oxford’s men. Northumberland took no action when signalled to assist his king, so Richard gambled everything on a charge across the battlefield to kill Henry and end the fight. Seeing the king’s knights separated from his army, Lord Stanley, and Sir William Stanley, who had brought a force to the battlefield, but held back while they decided which side it would be more advantageous to support, led their men to Henry’s aid, surrounding and killing Richard. Richard was the last English king to die in battle.

Following his death at Bosworth Field, Richard III’s body was thrown across a horse and carried to Leicester where, after a period of public display, it was buried inside Greyfriars Church. Ten years later, Henry VII paid for a tomb to be built. The tomb was presumed to have been demolished along with the Church following its dissolution after 1536.

Sir Robert Catlyn acquired the site following its dissolution by Henry VIII and sold it to Robert Herrick, who built a mansion with extensive gardens over the east end of the Friary grounds. These gardens were visited by Christopher Wren Sr. in 1611, who recorded being shown a handsome stone pillar with an inscription, “Here lies the body of Richard III, some time King of England”. Any remains of such a pillar having long since disappeared with the subsequent redevelopment of the land.

However, the Archaeology service of the University of Leicester, along with the Richard III Society and Leicester City Council, initiated an archaeological study resulting in three trenches being dug across the parking area behind the buildings on Greyfriars. These excavations revealed walls of the cloisters and the Church, enabling a possible layout for the monastic buildings to be drawn. Also found was the complete skeleton of a male showing severe scoliosis and major head wounds. On 4 February 2013 it was confirmed that the DNA matched, that the radiocarbon agreed, and that the characteristics of the bones and the nature of the head wounds were all entirely consistent with it being the remains of Richard III.

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Map of the week – St. Valentine’s Day

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Map: Valentines Farm, Hertfordshire 1870-1894

The History of St. Valentine’s Day
St. Valentine’s Day began as a religious celebration of one or more early Christian saints named Valentinus. Nothing is known reliably of St. Valentine except his name and that he died on the Via Flaminia north of Rome on February 14 sometime around the year 270.

The ‘Roman Martyrology‘, the Catholic Church’s official list of recognized saints, for February 14 gives only one Saint Valentine. It records that he was imprisoned for performing weddings for soldiers who were forbidden to marry and for ministering to Christians, who were persecuted under the Roman Emperor Claudius II. Claudius is said to have taken a liking to his prisoner – until Valentinus tried to convert the Emperor – whereupon the priest was condemned to death.

The feast of St. Valentine of February 14 was first established in 496 by Pope Gelasius I, but many of the current legends that characterise Saint Valentine were invented in the fourteenth century in England, notably by Geoffrey Chaucer and his contemporaries  when the feast day of February 14 first became associated with romantic love.

The earliest surviving valentines in English appear in the Paston Letters, written in 1477 by Margery Brewes to her future husband John Paston “my right well-beloved valentine, I recommend me unto you full heartedly”.

Love it or hate it, Valentines Day is getting ever nearer so why not buy your loved one a personal gift to remember that romantic place and time in your life?

Order now for delivery before the 14th February

Find the perfect personalised gift this St. Valentine’s Day