Map of the week – Berkeley Castle and the last days of Edward II

Berkeley Castle, whose origins date to the 11th century, can be found on the outskirts of the town of Berkeley, Gloucestershire and is traditionally believed to be the scene of the murder of King Edward II.
BerkelyCastle
The map shown above is a 1:2,500 county series map from 1880

Edward’s reign was marked by alleged incompetence, political squabbling and military losses including the devastating defeat at Bannockburn in 1314. He was eventually overthrown by his wife Isabella of France and Roger Mortimer, an exiled opponent of Edward, in favour of Isabella’s son who was crowned Edward III in January 1327.

After Edward II was deposed in 1326 he was exiled to Berkeley Castle, where in late September 1327, after a failed escape, he was reputedly murdered by means unknown. Although popular stories of a red hot poker or suffocation persist, some commentators have claimed that Edward’s escape was actually successful, and that someone else was later murdered in his place. Whatever the truth, much of the original fabric of Berkeley Castle still stands as a reminder of the last days of one of England’s Plantagenet kings.

Find Cassini downloadable maps

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s